Jeremy Glogan

Jeremy Glogan painting © Jeremy Glogan

Precursor

acrylic on canvas, 102 x 76 cm 2008

Jeremy Glogan painting © Jeremy Glogan

Foredate

acrylic on canvas 102 x 76 cm 2008

Jeremy Glogan painting © Jeremy Glogan

Foreshadower

acrylic on canvas 102 x 76 cm 2008

Jeremy Glogan painting © Jeremy Glogan

In Advance

acrylic on canvas, 102 x 76 cm 2008

Jeremy Glogan painting © Jeremy Glogan

Earlier

acrylic on canvas 102 x 76 cm 2008

Jeremy Glogan painting © Jeremy Glogan

Predecessor

acrylic on canvas, 102 x 76 cm 2008

Jeremy Glogan painting © Jeremy Glogan

Sooner

acrylic on canvas, 102 x 76 cm 2008

Jeremy Glogan painting © Jeremy Glogan

Prior

acrylic on canvas 102 x 76 cm 2008

Jeremy Glogan painting © Jeremy Glogan

Previously

acrylic on canvas 102 x 76 cm 2008

Jeremy Glogan painting © Jeremy Glogan

Ahead of Time

acrylic on canvas 102 x 76 cm 2008

Jeremy Glogan painting © Jeremy Glogan

Antecedent

acrylic on canvas 102 x 76 cm 2008

Jeremy Glogan painting © Jeremy Glogan

Before

acrylic on canvas 102 x 76 cm 2008

Jeremy Glogan painting © Jeremy Glogan

Beforehand

acrylic on canvas 102 x 76 cm 2008

Jeremy Glogan painting © Jeremy Glogan

Stations 1-30

acrylic on canvas, each 50 x 40 cm 2008

Jeremy Glogan painting © Jeremy Glogan

Forgot about Dre

acrylic marker on carboard, dimensions variable 2008

Jeremy Glogan painting © Jeremy Glogan

The Paintings I Did Before The Exhibition

Galerie Bleich-Rossi, Vienna 2008

Jeremy Glogan painting © Jeremy Glogan

The Paintings I Did Before The Exhibition

Galerie Bleich-Rossi, Vienna 2008

Jeremy Glogan painting © Jeremy Glogan

The Paintings I Did Before The Exhibition

Galerie Bleich-Rossi, Vienna 2008

Jeremy Glogan painting © Jeremy Glogan

The Paintings I Did Before The Exhibition

Galerie Bleich-Rossi, Vienna 2008

Jeremy Glogan painting © Jeremy Glogan

The Paintings I Did Before The Exhibition

Galerie Bleich-Rossi, Vienna 2008

Jeremy Glogan painting © Jeremy Glogan

The Paintings I Did Before The Exhibition

Galerie Bleich-Rossi, Vienna 2008

Press Release / Flyer

For his new exhibition at Galerie Bleich-Rossi Jeremy Glogan develops themes utilized in his recent show at Oechsner Galerie in Nuremberg. Both shows centre on groups of abstract paintings. Making use of tactics of diversion and contrivance, all these works are part of an ongoing engagement. If Glogan seems to be pursuing a question, it is this: what elusive qualities are at stake in the act of painting? The paintings owe a debt to Roger Hilton’s impulsive works of the 50s and 60s. They also evoke a sense of moment within the context of the exhibition that owes much to Barnett Newman. Glogan is drawn to a dynamic form of temporality in Newman’s images, as vertical lines tear momentarily through fields of color, and the very fact of painting seems to relate to time. Yet the interest here in Newman goes further than this. One of Glogan’s consistent points of reference for the past decade has been Jean Francois Lyotard’s account of the contemporary sublime. For Lyotard, the sublime offers a space of resistance to the force of capitalist modernity, an unstoppable machine enabled and enforced by a total control of knowledge. Newman’s moment embodies an evasive state. In resisting that which can be known there is a possibility of resistance to this form of knowledge as regime. Another element that continues to inform Glogan’s practice is the possibility of a correlation between the artist and a notion of the dandy, as described by the critic Carter Ratcliff. In Ratcliff’s account, the dandy wishes to appear outside the social machinations of cause and effect. Ratcliff writes that Manet’s brush “imposes a touch of inconsequentiality, a subtle but defiant pointlessness.” According to Ratcliff, there is in Manet’s brushwork a calm arrogance that produces a blank. This is suggestive of an attitude worth attempting, a subjective blankness akin to the icy silence that follows an unfunny joke. Here, silence and blankness are assigned a critical potential. The dandy’s unfunny joke opens a void in the fabric of the social, to be filled with the force of his will. Despite these preoccupations, Glogan is aware of the traps and pitfalls that lay ahead of an artist so explicitly and consistently aware of theoretical approaches to practice. There is a resistance to theory here, as much as there is a resistance to a dominance of image, or singularity of technique. The works in ‘The Paintings I Did Before the Exhibition’ are sited amongst a constellation of references, commitment s and investigations. In favoring the possibility of misunderstanding, or even of blankness, Glogan is staging an understated but intricate inquiry, the limits of which extend far beyond the limits of the painted surface. Dr. Dan Smith, Senior Lecturer Fine Art Theory, Chelsea College of Art and Design


exhibition by Jeremy Glogan